Fire adapted forest in the Little Applegate Valley and Applegate Adaptive Management Area (AMA). Photo: Luke Ruediger

Fire adapted forest in the Little Applegate Valley and Applegate Adaptive Management Area (AMA). Photo: Luke Ruediger

Applegate Adaptive Management Area

Do you want to have a role in shaping sustainable forest management in the Applegate Valley? Theoretically, through the Applegate Adaptive Management Area (AMA), your voice can have an impact.  The Forest Service and BLM are currently developing a project in the Upper Applegate Valley that will be created through community collaboration. The project will have fuel reduction and forest health thinning, but could accomplish many more goals with sustained community involvement. ANN will be engaged in the AMA process and we invite you to join us in shaping the future of public land in the Applegate Valley. Without community involvement the AMA could become yet another tool of the timber industry to get more logs out of the Applegate at the expense of fire resiliency, scenic viewsheds, clean water, and intact wildlands. This is a collaborative process that we should take advantage of or it may turn into just another timber sale. 

The Applegate AMA was created in 1994 through the Northwest Forest Plan. The objective of the Applegate Adaptive Management Area (AMA) is to develop and test new forest management approaches to integrate and achieve ecological and economic health and other social objectives. The AMAs are intended to be opportunities for innovation, experimentation and learning. Through innovative approaches and community collaboration with public land managers we can develop localized, idiosyncratic methods that will best reflect the needs of the land and communities. The approach to the AMA can rely on local knowledge of the land, site-specific standards, experience and ingenuity, rather than the typical approaches generally applied by the agencies in management of forests. 

The Applegate AMA includes lands managed by Medford District BLM (150,752 acres) and the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest (127,409 acres). Specific emphasis for the Applegate AMA includes the "development and testing of forest management practices including partial cutting, prescribed burning, and low impact approaches to forest harvest (e.g., aerial systems) that provide for a broad range of forest values, including late-successional forest and high quality riparian habitat (Applegate AMA Guide)."